Top 11 Best Gautama Buddha Poems on Wisdom

Gautama Buddha Poems

Top 11 Best Gautama Buddha Poems on Wisdom | Enjoy & Share with your Friends

Joy - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Let us live in joy, not hating those who hate us.
Among those who hate us, we live free of hate. 
Let us live in joy, 
free from disease among those who are diseased. 
Among those who are diseased, let us live free of disease. 
Let us live in joy, free from greed among the greedy. 
Among those who are greedy, we live free of greed. 
Let us live in joy, though we possess nothing. 
Let us live feeding on joy, like the bright gods.

Victory breeds hate, for the conquered is unhappy. 
Whoever has given up victory and defeat
is content and lives joyfully.

There is no fire like lust, no misfortune like hate; 
there is no pain like this body; 
there is no joy higher than peace.

Craving is the worst disease; 
disharmony is the greatest sorrow. 
The one who knows this truly
knows that nirvana is the highest bliss.

Health is the greatest gift; 
contentment is the greatest wealth; 
trusting is the best relationship; 
nirvana is the highest joy.

Whoever has tasted the sweetness
of solitude and tranquillity
becomes free from fear and sin
while drinking the sweetness of the truth. 
The sight of the noble is good; 
to live with them is always joyful.

Whoever does not see fools will always be happy. 
Whoever associates with fools suffers a long time. 
Being with fools, as with an enemy, is always painful.

Being with the wise, like meeting with family, is joyful. 
Therefore, one should follow the wise, the intelligent, 
the learned, the patient, the dutiful, the noble; 
one should follow the good and wise, 
as the moon follows the path of the stars. 

 

 

Miscellaneos - Poem by Gautama Buddha

If by leaving a small pleasure one sees a great pleasure, let a
wise man leave the small pleasure, and look to the great.

He who, by causing pain to others, wishes to obtain pleasure for
himself, he, entangled in the bonds of hatred, will never be free from
hatred.

What ought to be done is neglected, what ought not to be done is
done; the desires of unruly, thoughtless people are always increasing.

But they whose whole watchfulness is always directed to their
body, who do not follow what ought not to be done, and who steadfastly
do what ought to be done, the desires of such watchful and wise people
will come to an end.

A true Brahmana goes scatheless, though he have killed father and
mother, and two valiant kings, though he has destroyed a kingdom with
all its subjects.

A true Brahmana goes scatheless, though he have killed father and
mother, and two holy kings, and an eminent man besides.

The disciples of Gotama (Buddha) are always well awake, and their
thoughts day and night are always set on Buddha.

The disciples of Gotama are always well awake, and their thoughts
day and night are always set on the law.

The disciples of Gotama are always well awake, and their thoughts
day and night are always set on the church.

The disciples of Gotama are always well awake, and their thoughts
day and night are always set on their body.

The disciples of Gotama are always well awake, and their mind day
and night always delights in compassion.

The disciples of Gotama are always well awake, and their mind day
and night always delights in meditation.

It is hard to leave the world (to become a friar) , it is hard to
enjoy the world; hard is the monastery, painful are the houses; 
painful it is to dwell with equals (to share everything in common) and
the itinerant mendicant is beset with pain. Therefore let no man be
an itinerant mendicant and he will not be beset with pain.

Whatever place a faithful, virtuous, celebrated, and wealthy man
chooses, there he is respected.

Good people shine from afar, like the snowy mountains; bad people
are not seen, like arrows shot by night.

He alone who, without ceasing, practises the duty of sitting
alone and sleeping alone, he, subduing himself, will rejoice in the
destruction of all desires alone, as if living in a forest. 

 

 

Old Age - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Why is there laughter, why is there joy
while this world is always burning? 
Why do you not seek a light, 
you who are shrouded in darkness?

Consider this dressed-up lump covered with wounds, 
joined with limbs, diseased, and full of many schemes
which are neither permanent nor stable. 
This body is wearing out, a nest of diseases and frail; 
this heap of corruption falls apart; life ends in death.

What pleasure is there
for one who sees these white bones
like gourds thrown away in the autumn? 
A fortress is made out of the bones, 
plastered over with flesh and blood,
and in it lives old age and death, pride and deceit.

The glorious chariots of the kings wear out; 
the body also comes to old age; 
but the virtue of good people never ages; 
thus the good teach each other.

People who have learned little grow old like an ox; 
their flesh grows, but their knowledge does not grow.

I have run through a course of many births
looking for the maker of this dwelling and did not find it; 
painful is birth again and again. 
Now you are seen, the builder of the house; 
you will not build the house again. 
All your rafters are broken; your ridgepole is destroyed; 
your mind, set on the attainment of nirvana, 
has attained the extinction of desires.

People who have not practiced proper discipline
who have not acquired wealth in their youth, 
pine away like old cranes in a lake without fish. 
People who have not practiced proper discipline, 
who have not acquired wealth in their youth, 
lie like broken bows, sighing after the past. 

 

 

Pleasure - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Whoever gives oneself to distractions
and does not give oneself to meditation, 
forgetting true purpose and grasping at pleasure, 
will eventually envy the one who practices meditation.

Let no one cling to what is pleasant or unpleasant. 
Not to see what is pleasant is painful, 
as it is to see what is unpleasant. 
Therefore do not become attached to anything; 
loss of what is loved is painful. 
Those who have neither likes nor dislikes have no chains.

From pleasure comes grief; from pleasure comes fear. 
Whoever is free from pleasure knows neither grief nor fear.

From attachment comes grief; from attachment comes fear. 
Whoever is free from attachment knows neither grief nor fear.

From greed comes grief; from greed comes fear. 
Whoever is free from greed knows neither grief nor fear.

From lust comes grief; from lust comes fear. 
Whoever is free from lust knows neither grief nor fear.

From craving comes grief; from craving comes fear. 
Whoever is free from craving knows neither grief nor fear.

Whoever has virtue and insight, 
who is just, truthful, and does one's own work, 
the world will love.

The one in whom a desire for the ineffable has arisen, 
whose mind is satisfied
and whose thoughts are free from desires
is called one who ascends the stream.

Family, friends, and well-wishers welcome a person
who has been away long and returns safely from afar. 
Similarly, one's good actions receive the good person
who has gone from this world to the other, 
as family receive a friend who is returning. 

 

 

Punishment - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Everyone trembles at punishment; everyone fears death. 
Likening others to oneself, 
one should neither kill nor cause killing.

Everyone trembles at punishment; everyone loves life. 
Likening others to oneself, 
one should neither kill nor cause killing.

Whoever seeking one's own happiness
inflicts pain on others who also want happiness
will not find happiness after death.

Whoever seeking one's own happiness
does not inflict pain on others who also want happiness
will find happiness after death.

Do not speak anything harsh. 
Those who are spoken to will answer you. 
Angry talk is painful, and retaliation will touch you. 
If you make yourself as still as a broken gong, 
you have attained nirvana, for anger is not known to you.

Just as a cowherd with a staff
drives the cows into the pasture, 
so old age and death drive the life of living beings.

A fool committing wrong actions does not know
that the stupid person burns through one's own deeds, 
like one burned by fire.

Whoever inflicts punishment
on those who do not deserve it
and offends against those who are without offense
soon comes to one of these ten states: 
cruel suffering, infirmity, injury of the body, fearful pain, 
or mental loss, or persecution from the ruler, 
or a fearful accusation, loss of relations, 
or destruction of possessions, 
or lightning fire burning one's houses, 
and when one's body is destroyed the fool goes to hell.

Neither nakedness nor matted hair nor mud
nor fasting nor lying on the ground
nor rubbing with dust nor sitting motionless
purify a mortal who is not free from doubt and desire.

Whoever though dressed in fine clothes, lives peacefully, 
is calm, controlled, restrained, pure, 
and does not hurt any other beings, 
that one is holy, an ascetic, a mendicant.

Is there in the world anyone
who is so restrained by modesty
that they avoid blame like a trained horse avoids the whip? 
Like a trained horse when touched by a whip, 
be strenuous and eager, and by faith, by virtue, by energy, 
by meditation, by discernment of the truth
you will overcome this great sorrow, 
perfected in knowledge, behaviour, and mindfulness.

Engineers of canals guide the water; 
fletchers make the arrow straight; 
carpenters shape the wood; 
good people mould themselves. 

 

 

Self - Poem by Gautama Buddha

If a person holds oneself dear, 
let one watch oneself carefully. 
The wise should be watchful
during at least one of the three watches.

Let each person first direct oneself to what is right; 
then let one teach others; thus the wise will not suffer. 
If a person makes oneself as one teaches others to be, 
then being well-controlled, that one might guide others, 
since self-control is difficult.

Self is the master of self; 
who else could be the master? 
With self well-controlled
a person finds a master such as few can find.

The wrong done by oneself, born of oneself, 
produced by oneself, crushes the fool, 
just as a diamond breaks even a precious stone. 
The one whose vice is great brings oneself down
to that condition where one's enemy wishes one to be, 
just as a creeper overpowers the entangled sala tree. 
Bad actions and actions harmful to ourselves are easy to do; 
what is beneficial and good, that is very difficult to do.

The fool who scorns the teaching of the saintly, 
the noble, and the virtuous, and follows wrong ideas, 
bears fruit to one's own destruction, 
like the fruits of the katthaka reed.

By oneself is wrong done; by oneself one suffers; 
by oneself is wrong left undone; by oneself is one purified. 
Purity and impurity come from oneself; 
no one can purify another.

Let no one neglect one's own duty
for the sake of another's, however great; 
let a person after one has discerned one's own duty, 
be always attentive to this duty.

 

 

The Awakened - Poem by Gautama Buddha

The one whose conquest cannot be conquered again, 
into whose conquest no one in this world enters, 
by what track can you lead that one, 
the awakened, the omniscient, the trackless?

The one whom no desire
with its snares and poisons can lead astray, 
by what track can you lead that one, 
the awakened, the omniscient, the trackless?

Even the gods emulate those who are awakened and aware, 
who are given to meditation, who are wise, 
and who find joy in the peace of renunciation.

It is difficult to be born as a human being; 
difficult is the life of mortals; 
difficult is the hearing of the true path; 
difficult is the awakening of enlightenment.

Not to do wrong, to do good, and to purify one's mind, 
that is the teaching of the awakened ones. 
The awakened call patience the highest sacrifice; 
the awakened declare nirvana the highest good.

The one who strikes others is not a hermit; 
one is not an ascetic who insults others. 
Not to blame, not to strike, 
to live restrained under the law, 
to be moderate in eating, to live alone, 
and to practice the highest consciousness--
this is the teaching of the awakened ones.

There is no satisfying lusts, 
even by a shower of gold pieces. 
Whoever knows that lusts have a short taste
and cause pain is wise. 
Even in heavenly pleasures one finds no satisfaction; 
the disciple who is fully awakened
finds joy only in the destruction of all desires.

People driven by fear go for refuge
to mountains and forests, to sacred groves and shrines. 
That is not a safe refuge; that is not the best refuge. 
After having got to that refuge, 
a person is not delivered from all pains.

Whoever takes refuge with the awakened one, 
the truth, and the community, 
who with clear understanding perceives the four noble truths: 
namely suffering, the origin of suffering, 
the cessation of suffering, and the eightfold holy way
that leads to the cessation of suffering, 
that is the safe refuge; that is the best refuge; 
having gone to that refuge, 
a person is delivered from all pains.

A person of true vision is not easy to find; 
they are not born everywhere. 
Wherever such a sage is born, the people there prosper. 
Blessed is the arising of the awakened; 
blessed is the teaching of the truth; 
blessed is the harmony of the community; 
blessed is the devotion of those who live in peace.

Whoever gives reverence to those worthy of reverence, 
whether the awakened or their disciples, 
those who have overcome the army
and crossed the river of sorrow, 
whoever gives reverence to such as have found deliverance
and are free of fear, 
their merit cannot be measured by anyone.

 

 

The Brahmin - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Stop the stream valiantly, drive away the desires, O Brahmana! 
When you have understood the destruction of all that was made, 
you will understand that which was not made.

If the Brahmana has reached the other shore in both laws (in restraint and contemplation), 
all bonds vanish from him who has obtained knowledge.

He for whom there is neither this nor that shore, nor both, him,
the fearless and unshackled, I call indeed a Brahmana.

He who is thoughtful, blameless, settled, dutiful, without
passions, and who has attained the highest end, 
him I call indeed a Brahmana.

The sun is bright by day, the moon shines by night, the warrior
is bright in his armour, the Brahmana is bright in his meditation; 
but Buddha, the Awakened, is bright with splendour day and night.

Because a man is rid of evil, therefore he is called Brahmana;
because he walks quietly, therefore he is called Samana; 
because he has sent away his own impurities, 
therefore he is called Pravragita (Pabbagita, a pilgrim).

No one should attack a Brahmana, but no Brahmana (if attacked)
should let himself fly at his aggressor! Woe to him who strikes a
Brahmana, more woe to him who flies at his aggressor!

It advantages a Brahmana not a little if he holds his mind back from the pleasures of life; 
when all wish to injure has vanished, pain will cease.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who does not offend by body, word,
or thought, and is controlled on these three points.

After a man has once understood the law as taught by the Well-
awakened (Buddha), let him worship it carefully, 
as the Brahmana worships the sacrificial fire.

A man does not become a Brahmana by his platted hair, by his
family, or by birth; in whom there is truth and righteousness, 
he is blessed, he is a Brahmana.

What is the use of platted hair, O fool! what of the raiment of
goat-skins? Within thee there is ravening, 
but the outside thou makest clean.

The man who wears dirty raiments, who is emaciated and covered
with veins, who lives alone in the forest, 
and meditates, him I call indeed a Brahmana.

I do not call a man a Brahmana because of his origin or of his
mother. He is indeed arrogant, and he is wealthy: but the poor, who
is free from all attachments, him I call indeed a Brahmana.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who has cut all fetters, who never
trembles, is independent and unshackled.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who has cut the strap and the thong,
the chain with all that pertains to it, 
who has burst the bar, and is awakened.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who, though he has committed no
offence, endures reproach, bonds, and stripes, 
who has endurance for his force, and strength for his army.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who is free from anger, dutiful,
virtuous, without appetite, who is subdued, 
and has received his last body.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who does not cling to pleasures,
like water on a lotus leaf, 
like a mustard seed on the point of a needle.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who, even here, knows the end of his
suffering, has put down his burden, and is unshackled.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana whose knowledge is deep,
who possesses wisdom, 
who knows the right way and the wrong, 
and has attained the highest end.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who keeps aloof both from laymen and
from mendicants, who frequents no houses, and has but few desires.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who finds no fault with other
beings, whether feeble or strong, 
and does not kill nor cause slaughter.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who is tolerant with the intolerant,
mild with fault-finders, and free from passion among the passionate.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana from whom anger and hatred, pride
and envy have dropt like a mustard seed from the point of a needle.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who utters true speech, instructive
and free from harshness, so that he offend no one.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who takes nothing in the world that
is not given him, be it long or short, small or large, good or bad.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who fosters no desires for this
world or for the next, has no inclinations, and is unshackled.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who has no interests, and when he
has understood (the truth), does not say How, how? 
and who has reached the depth of the Immortal.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who in this world is above good and evil, 
above the bondage of both, free from grief from sin, and from impurity.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who is bright like the moon, pure,
serene, undisturbed, and in whom all gaiety is extinct.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who has traversed this miry road,
the impassable world and its vanity, who has gone through, and reached
the other shore, is thoughtful, guileless, free from doubts, free from
attachment, and content.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who in this world, leaving all desires, 
travels about without a home, and in whom all concupiscence is extinct.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who, leaving all longings, travels
about without a home, and in whom all covetousness is extinct.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who, after leaving all bondage to men, 
has risen above all bondage to the gods, and is free from all and every bondage.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who has left what gives pleasure and
what gives pain, who is cold, and free from all germs (of renewed
life), the hero who has conquered all the worlds.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who knows the destruction and the
return of beings everywhere, who is free from bondage, welfaring
(Sugata), and awakened (Buddha).

Him I call indeed a Brahmana whose path the gods do not know, 
nor spirits (Gandharvas), nor men, 
whose passions are extinct, and who is an Arhat (venerable).

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who calls nothing his own, whether
it be before, behind, or between, 
who is poor, and free from the love of the world.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana, the manly, the noble, the hero, the
great sage, the conqueror, the impassible, the accomplished, the awakened.

Him I call indeed a Brahmana who knows his former abodes, who
sees heaven and hell, has reached the end of births, is perfect in
knowledge, a sage, and whose perfections are all perfect. 

 

 

The Downward Course - Poem by Gautama Buddha

He who says what is not, goes to hell; he also who, having done a thing, says I have not done it. After death both are equal, they are
men with evil deeds in the next world.

Many men whose shoulders are covered with the yellow gown are ill-conditioned and unrestrained; such evil-doers by their evil deeds go to hell.

Better it would be to swallow a heated iron ball, like flaring fire, than that a bad unrestrained fellow should live on the charity of the land.

Four things does a wreckless man gain who covets his neighbour's wife,-a bad reputation, an uncomfortable bed, thirdly, punishment, and lastly, hell.

There is bad reputation, and the evil way (to hell), there is the short pleasure of the frightened in the arms of the frightened, and the king imposes heavy punishment; therefore let no man think of his neighbour's wife.

As a grass-blade, if badly grasped, cuts the arm, badly-practised asceticism leads to hell.

An act carelessly performed, a broken vow, and hesitating obedience to discipline, all this brings no great reward.

If anything is to be done, let a man do it, let him attack it vigorously! A careless pilgrim only scatters the dust of his passions
more widely.

An evil deed is better left undone, for a man repents of it afterwards; a good deed is better done, for having done it, one does not repent.

Like a well-guarded frontier fort, with defences within and without, so let a man guard himself. Not a moment should escape, for they who allow the right moment to pass, suffer pain when they are in hell.

They who are ashamed of what they ought not to be ashamed of, and are not ashamed of what they ought to be ashamed of, such men,
embracing false doctrines enter the evil path.

They who fear when they ought not to fear, and fear not when they ought to fear, such men, embracing false doctrines, enter the evil
path.

They who forbid when there is nothing to be forbidden, and forbid not when there is something to be forbidden, such men, embracing false doctrines, enter the evil path.

They who know what is forbidden as forbidden, and what is not forbidden as not forbidden, such men, embracing the true doctrine,
enter the good path.

 

 

The Elephant - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Silently shall I endure abuse as the elephant in battle endures
the arrow sent from the bow: for the world is ill-natured.
They lead a tamed elephant to battle, the king mounts a tamed
elephant; the tamed is the best among men, he who silently endures abuse.

Mules are good, if tamed, and noble Sindhu horses, and elephants
with large tusks; but he who tames himself is better still.

For with these animals does no man reach the untrodden country
(Nirvana), where a tamed man goes on a tamed animal, viz. on his own well-tamed self.

The elephant called Dhanapalaka, his temples running with sap,
and difficult to hold, does not eat a morsel when bound; the elephant
longs for the elephant grove.

If a man becomes fat and a great eater, if he is sleepy and rolls
himself about, that fool, like a hog fed on wash, is born again and again.

This mind of mine went formerly wandering about as it liked, as
it listed, as it pleased; but I shall now hold it in thoroughly, as
the rider who holds the hook holds in the furious elephant.

Be not thoughtless, watch your thoughts! Draw yourself out of
the evil way, like an elephant sunk in mud.

If a man find a prudent companion who walks with him, is wise,
and lives soberly, he may walk with him, overcoming all dangers,
happy, but considerate.

If a man find no prudent companion who walks with him, is wise,
and lives soberly, let him walk alone, like a king who has left his
conquered country behind,-like an elephant in the forest.

It is better to live alone, there is no companionship with a
fool; let a man walk alone, let him commit no sin, with few wishes,
like an elephant in the forest.

If an occasion arises, friends are pleasant; enjoyment is
pleasant, whatever be the cause; a good work is pleasant in the hour
of death; the giving up of all grief is pleasant.

Pleasant in the world is the state of a mother, pleasant the
state of a father, pleasant the state of a Samana, pleasant the state of a Brahmana.

Pleasant is virtue lasting to old age, pleasant is a faith firmly
rooted; pleasant is attainment of intelligence, pleasant is avoiding of sins. 

 

 

The Fool - Poem by Gautama Buddha

Long is the night to one who is awake. 
Long is ten miles to one who is tired. 
Long is the cycle of birth and death
to the fool who does not know the true path.

If a traveller does not meet with one who is better or equal, 
let one firmly travel alone; 
there is no companionship with a fool.

'These sons belong to me, and this wealth belongs to me;'
with such thoughts a fool is tormented. 
One does not belong to oneself; 
how much less sons and wealth?

The fool who knows one's own folly, 
is wise at least to that extent; 
but the fool who thinks oneself wise is really a fool.

If a fool is associated with a wise person all one's life, 
the fool will not perceive the truth, 
any more than a spoon will taste the soup.

If an intelligent person is associated with a wise person
for only one minute, one will soon perceive the truth, 
just as the tongue does the taste of soup.

Fools of little understanding are their own worst enemies, 
for they do wrong deeds which bear bitter fruits. 
That action is not well done, which having been done, 
brings remorse, whose result one receives crying with tears. 
But that action is well done, which having been done, 
does not bring remorse, 
whose result one receives gladly and cheerfully.

As long as the wrong action does not bear fruit, 
the fool thinks it is like honey; 
but when it bears fruit, then the fool suffers grief.

Let a fool month after month
eat food with the tip of kusha grass; 
nevertheless one is not worth one-sixteenth
of those who have understood the truth.

A wrong action, like newly drawn milk, does not turn soon; 
smouldering, like fire covered by ashes, it follows the fool. 
When the wrong action, after it has become known, 
turns to sorrow for the fool, 
then it destroys one's brightness and splits the head.

Let the fool wish for reputation, 
for precedence among the mendicants, 
for authority in the convents, 
for veneration among the people.

'Let both the householders and the mendicants
think that this is done by me. 
Let them always ask me
what should be done and what should not be done.'

Such is the wish of the fool
of increasing desire and pride. 
One road leads to wealth; another road leads to nirvana. 
Let the mendicant, the disciple of Buddha, learn this, 
and not strive for honour but seek wisdom.

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